Introduction The Parsonage Garden at Nuenen is an oil painting done by one famous artist called Vincent Van Gogh in 1884. He did work when still living in Nuenen with his parents. During the same time, he did many other oil paintings, some of which are remembered. From 1962 to 2020, The Parsonage Garden at Nuenen was available in Groninger Museum collection, Netherlands. However, it was stolen from the group on 30th March 2020, a closed museum due to the COVID-19 pandemic from the time of writing. Background Information Van Gogh lived alongside Sien Hoomik in The Hague and spent a few months living by himself in Drenthe, northern Netherlands. The artist left to live with the parents in the Dutch Reformed Church located in Nuenen, not far from Eindhoven. There was a room at the back of the house that the family turned into an art studio. He stayed in the same place with his parents for more than 24 months. During this time, Vincent Van Gogh created at least 200 paintings. However, in 1885, he shifted to Antwerp and moved to Paris the following year. Description Vincent Van Gogh created the parsonage garden at the Nuenen that was enclosed by a tall stone wall and featured a duck pond, paths, boat dock, hedges, garden plots, etc. This drawing was the preceded wintery drawings. The Parsonage Garden at Nuenen manifests a clear view of a garden with a woman dressed in dark clothing in the background. From a far distance, there are ruins of an old worship place. It is believed that this was the Old Church Tower at Nuenen, a few months after it was demolished. The painting is created using a dark palette of browns and green. Vincent Van Gogh is one of the few ancient painters who knew how to use color to communicate important messages to their audience. This is openly shown in how a mix of colors is used in The Parsonage Garden at Nuenen. The Bottom Line The Parsonage Garden at Nuenen is more of just an ancient drawing. The colors in the drawing show that winter has passed spring has just commenced. The painting is not very big, measuring 25cm by 57cm, and does not feature a decorative frame. It has spent many years in the museum but is no longer there at the moment.